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"...research shows that student engagement and achievement improves when teachers develop positive teaching and learning relationships with Māori students..."

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: The Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012, page 23.

The concept of ako describes a teaching and learning relationship where the educator is also learning from the student and where educators’ practices are informed by the latest research and are both deliberate and reflective. Ako is grounded in the principle of reciprocity and recognises that the learner and whānau cannot be separated.

The resources you will find on this page reflect the principles of ako and provide examples of this in the classroom and beyond.

  1. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Identity Language and Culture | Ako | Research & evaluation | Effective leaders

    In this sabbatical leave report from Bruce Pagan, Principal, Kaikoura Primary School; Bruce investigates the effects/benefits that the pursuit of culturally significant events can have on Māori student achievement, with particular reference to those families/students that engage regularly in hui, muttonbirding, and carving.

  2. Filed under: Ako | Research & evaluation | Effective teachers

    QTR&D was an exploratory project founded on the beliefs that all young people can succeed at school and that one of the keys to enabling students to achieve their potential is effective classroom teaching.

    Seven of the reports developed through QTR&D have been adapted as learning stories; these are included in this set of materials as springboards for thinking about the Teaching as Inquiry cycle, effective pedagogy, and cultural responsiveness and how they might connect to your own practice.

  3. Filed under: Ako | Research & evaluation

    This is an evaluation report of a pilot PD programme to upskill English medium teachers of Māori language in secondary schools, specifically around second language teaching methods, the Māori language curriculum guidelines, planning, assessment, teaching/learning strategies, and the use of resources.

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