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Productive partnerships

“Increasing whānau and iwi authority and involvement in education is critical to improving presence, engagement, and achievement. To achieve this, parents and whānau must be actively involved in decision-making and their children’s learning in all education settings.”

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: The Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012, page 28.

Productive partnerships incorporate Māori students, whānau, and educators sharing knowledge and expertise with each other to produce better outcomes for Māori learners. This principle includes taking a ‘personalised learning’ approach that puts every learner and their achievement at the heart of education and recognises that one size fits one.

The resources you will find on this page reflect these principles of productive partnership and provide examples of this from schools across New Zealand.

  1. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    An idea from whānau became the basis of a successful intervention to tackle attendance issues.

  2. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    When Henderson Intermediate staff were open and honest about the issues of Māori student achievement with whānau, they received an immediate response of support.

  3. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    Keriana Tawhiwhirangi provides advice on how to initiate dialogue with whānau. (Extract from ‘Te ManaKōrero: Relationships for Learning’, 2007).

  4. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    Keriana Tawhiwhirangi and Wally Penetito reflect on the risks inherent in failing to maintain productive partnerships with whānau. (Extract from ‘Te ManaKōrero: Relationships for Learning’, 2007).

  5. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    It’s not enough to invite the community to come to you - you have to go into the community. At Hiruharama School, every Friday senior students, the principal and whānau are involved in the delivery of meals-on-wheels to the kuia and kaumatua in the area. (Extract from ‘Te ManaKōrero: Relationships for Learning’, 2007).

  6. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders | Effective teachers

    A regional example of celebration of student learning with their community is the annual Nati awards on the East Coast of the North Island. (Extract from ‘Te ManaKōrero: Relationships for Learning’, 2007).

  7. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    The need for whānau involvement does not diminish as students advance through schooling, and schools need to ensure their relationships with whānau extend beyond the immediate family. Regular communication is key. (Extract from ‘Te Mana Kōrero: Relationships for Learning’, 2007).

  8. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    Whānau and community involvement in school life can and should extend beyond supporting the school at cultural and sporting activities, and lead to engagement which directly supports students’ learning. At Hiruharama School, whānau are engaged at every level including strategic planning. (Extract from ‘Te Mana Kōrero: Relationships for Learning’, 2007).

  9. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    Relationships with whānau and communities. Research evidence shows that when schools develop relationships with whānau and communities around child learning, then the learning outcomes improve for all their students. (Extract from ‘Te Mana Kōrero : Strengthening Professional Practice’, 2005).

  10. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Identity Language and Culture | Effective leaders

    Developing an inclusive curriculum. At Rotorua Lakes and Greymouth High Schools, student and whānau knowledge is validated through its introduction into the context for learning. (Extract from ‘Te Mana Kōrero: Strengthening Professional Practice’, 2005).

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