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Productive partnerships

“Increasing whānau and iwi authority and involvement in education is critical to improving presence, engagement, and achievement. To achieve this, parents and whānau must be actively involved in decision-making and their children’s learning in all education settings.”

Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: The Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012, page 28.

Productive partnerships incorporate Māori students, whānau, and educators sharing knowledge and expertise with each other to produce better outcomes for Māori learners. This principle includes taking a ‘personalised learning’ approach that puts every learner and their achievement at the heart of education and recognises that one size fits one.

The resources you will find on this page reflect these principles of productive partnership and provide examples of this from schools across New Zealand.

  1. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders | Effective teachers

    Lincoln High School investigates how, as part of a cluster arrangement, a school can foster the development of an effective professional learning community that is focused on teaching as inquiry and premised on three underpinning principles: ako (reciprocal learning), culture counts, and productive partnerships.

  2. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    Sally Wilson, Principal, Raurimu Avenue School discusses how she used the school’s commitment to Ka Hikitia to make dramatic changes at Raurimu Avenue School.

  3. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    The community engagement section of the New Zealand Curriculum Online website presents resources on this site support school leaders, teachers and professional learning facilitators as they engage with school communities.

  4. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Identity Language and Culture | Effective leaders

    The Special Education (SE) Māori strategy uses the imagery of a meeting house (wharenui) to explain how Service Provision for Māori can be facilitated within the context of Special Education.

  5. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders | Effective teachers

    Approaches to conceptualising, identifying and providing for gifted and talented Māori students are dual faceted: they may emanate from Te Ao Māori; a Māori worldview on the one hand, and have significant connotations to Te Ao Hurihuri (the global world) on the other.

  6. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Research & evaluation | Effective leaders

    This working paper written by Ally Bull for NZCER, discusses the relationship between schools and their communities. It explores the purpose of different school-community initiatives and discusses the case for a wider public engagement in education for the purpose of rethinking how schools meet the needs of all learners in the 21st century.

  7. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Research & evaluation

    In this article from Research Information for Teachers, Dr Helen Timperley and Associate Professor Viviane Robinson examine what is meant by the term ‘partnership’ when applied in an education context.

  8. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective leaders

    Hine Waitere, the Professional Development Director of He Kākano, describes the willingness of participating schools to look at things differently, to engage more broadly to bring about better learning outcomes for Māori students.

  9. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Identity Language and Culture | Effective leaders

    Yolanda Julies, Principal at Te Kura Reo Rua o Waikirikiri, discusses the importance of establishing a shared understanding and supportive school culture as the school explored the national curriculum documents.

  10. Filed under: Productive partnerships | Effective teachers

    Home–school partnerships are shared relationships and initiatives between schools and whānau. Students are part of both groups, which together make up the wider school community.

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