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27/09/2012

Whare Māori - images exploring the unique architectural history of Māori.

Te Pātaka Matihiko – Digistore is an online storehouse of digital content that can be used to support the New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa. Digital content includes audio, video, learning objects, and images.

Te Pātaka Matihiko – Digistore has added a Whare Māori series profiling photographs of important Māori buildings. The buildings showcased feature in Whare Māori, a 13 part television documentary series dedicated to exploring the unique architectural history of Māori.

The images are cataloged as follows:

  • This collection of six photographs tells the story of Rātana, a spiritual and political movement that emerged in the 1920s. 
  • This collection of six photographs provides images of contemporary New Zealand buildings that have been inspired by Māori architectural style and culture.
  • This collection of seven photographs showcases a range of buildings that have been influenced by wahine (women).
  • This collection of seven photographs tells the story of Rangiātea Church in Ōtaki. The church features in Whare Māori, a 13 part television documentary series dedicated to exploring the unique architectural history of our Māori ancestors.
  • This collection of eight photographs tells the story of the Ringatū faith (a Māori religion) and provides views of two different wharenui that were constructed as a place to worship.
  • This collection of ten photographs shows a range of buildings from Māori villages (papakāinga) throughout New Zealand.
  • This collection of nine photographs shows some fine examples of New Zealand churches that were built using both European and Māori architectural styles.
  • This collection of ten photographs shows several different wharenui (meeting houses) from throughout New Zealand.

Questions / Things to think about

  1. How can you incorporate Māori buildings and architechture into your curriculum?
  2. What might your students or their whānau know about these objects? How could they, or their whānau share this knowledge with the class?
  3. Where in your community might you see examples of Māori buildings or architecture?

Filed under: ako | effective teachers

Tags: identity | language and culture

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